What Exactly is Autism?

What Exactly is Autism?

Autism. Even that actual name itself sometimes seems to be somehow cloaked in a shroud of mystery. Unfortunately, even to his very day, Autism still remains rather misunderstood by the general society at large. Perhaps part of the reason for this is because of the fact that autistic people themselves are generally usually so misunderstood as well. Despite what many people may probably think, Autism is not an illness. Instead, it is a disorder that primarily impacts a person’s neurological system, which then, over time, eventually begins to impair the person’s ability to interact in social settings. The neurological disorder Autism typically occurs in the world’s population at a rate of approximately one to two children per one thousand overall children, and it also usually occurs at about a 25% higher rate in little boys than in little girls. On occasion, in the medical field, Autism is commonly sometimes mis-diagnosed as Asperger’s Syndrome due to the two disorders’ common similarities in terms of overt behavioral patterns displayed by the child. {{more}}Like many of the other neurological disorders, Autism also typically progresses in developmental stages. Many of the child’s less severe autistic symptoms will usually typically gradually start to show themselves close to the age of about six months. In most cases, clinical diagnosis for autistic children occurs in between the ages of about 2 to 4 years old, and this is because of the fact that it is typically usually between the two and four year old window when the young autistic child will usually typically display more of the outward behavioral symptoms of the Autism disorder.Finally, in between the ages of about four years old to seven years old, the autistic child will typically display more of the over signs of regression in his or her ability to both communicate with others as well as to interpret communication coming from others. As the Autism disorder continues to progress, there is generally also usually an overall regression in the autistic person’s overall social interactive skills.