The Second Civil Rights

The Second Civil Rights

By Elroy Johnson IV After the deaths of unarmed black men Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and Freddie Gray, the nation has risen to the sounds of “Hands Up, don’t shoot”, “Black lives matter”, and “I can’t breathe” . These phrases have rippled across the nation and has found its way to Texas. The phrases have been accompanied by tens of thousands of protestors in virtually every major American city, including Dallas. The current movement has been called by some such as Roland Martin, the “Second Civil Rights Movement”. Considering the fact that the nation hasn’t seen this much unrest since {{more}} the last Civil Rights Movement. There have literally been 10,000 protesters at one time in cities such as New York. These protestors often have demands such as police reform, an indictment of Police officers who’ve killed unarmed individuals, and an end to systematic racism in America. In Dallas, the movement is no different. In DFW a somewhat underground society of protestors, civil rights leaders, and human rights activists have been coming together for months to ensure the sounds of chants such as “Black lives Matter” and “Indict, convict, send those killer cops to jail, the whole damn system is guilty as hell” is heard throughout North Texas. The protestors in the DFW community often come with signs bearing names of national figures such as Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, and more recently Freddie Gray and with the names of local individuals killed at the hands of the local police, often unarmed. One of the cases that’s beginning to make national news is the killing of unarmed Hispanic male, Ruben Garcia. This immigrant father of four was killed in earlier this year by a Grapevine Police Officer, Officer Clark. As of May 2015 the Tarrant County Grand Jury has decided not to indicate Officer Clark. This case similar to that of Eric Garner’s was videotaped. Mr. Garcia was shot twice and he later died in a local hospital, protests have occurred since then in the name of Ruben Garcia. There have been several questions that has risen out of this current movement, here are a few:• Do we need an entire reorganization of how we “police” in the United States?• Is this an issue mainly affecting communities of color?• Will these marches continue to occur nationally in such large numbers?• Will the federal government get more involved in local cases nationally?These are questions I look forward to answering in a follow-up piece. -Elroy Johnson IV