HSU Leadership Awards

HSU Leadership Awards

HSU Leadership AwardsBy Joe Starkey Tomorrow’s Leaders Today Scholarships were presented to Christina Bull, Lauren Clemons and Sarah Rousseau and the Erin Greer Memorial Scholarship was awarded to Lindy Morff. Candidates for President of the Freshman Class, David DeLaCruz and Ryan Jones gave short speeches to get out the vote in their favor Guest speaker, Mr. Victor Carrillo, class of ’86 welcomed the students and faculty of Hardin Simmons University to the “Tomorrow’s Leaders Today Scholarship” awards stating that scholarships make a tremendous differences in education by giving opportunities to the deserving. The scholarships he received made a tremendous difference in his life and are important in developing leaders for the future. He came not to speak on oil and gas as might be expected of the Chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission but on what it means to get an education “enlightened by faith.” He looked back on fond memories of HSU and setting in assemblies like the one he addressed. He expressed amazement at the fact that it was 20 years ago and that he was no longer even eligible for the Board of Young Associates who sponsored the event as he was past his 40th birthday. Commenting that he had accepted God’s guidance throughout his life and career, he reminded the students that God seldom speaks in an overwhelming voice but His voice is more likely to be small and quiet. His early career plans were to stay home in Abilene, get a geology degree and go to work for one of the several hundred small gas and oil businesses in town. These plans were disrupted by the Oil Bust of the 80’s when oil dropped to $10.00 a barrel and most of them went out of business. His new plan was to get a graduate degree and go to work for an international oil company which took him to Houston to work for Amoco for 4 years. This work led him to dream of law school which took him to Austin there he worked for the State of Texas. At each decision point in his life, he prayed for guidance and then listened. Mr. Carrillo returned to Abilene as an assistant City Attorney and was given the opportunity to become first an adjunct professor at HSU and then a full time faculty member. As a teacher of Introductory Government and beginning law classes, he encouraged students to both participate and serve in government. This led him to realize that he should do likewise resulting in positions on the Abilene City Council and appointment as a Taylor County Judge. All of these twists and turns, two unrelated geology degrees and a law degree were not planned to qualify him to be selected to join the Texas Railroad Commission but “God is the architect of our experience” and he had exactly the qualifications needed to be selected to complete a term. Being reelected in 2004 by over 4 million Texas voters was described as an “awesome experience.” “Seek God’s will in your life” is the most important part of an education and career. “Lean not on your own understanding but follow God’s will in all ways.” The future career of Victor Carrillo may be on the Railroad Commission or in something, I have never considered but God will continue to guide me all my life. Students were asked to do the best you can in all you do. Study Hard. Play hard. Do all things with gusto and enjoy life in God’s will. Some time was spent with local media before the assembly in which Commissioner Carrillo addressed oil and gas issues. He stated that the early reports of major shutdowns were now being modified and that most of the refineries and pipelines were coming back on line. Those operating are now at 25-50% and should be up to full capacity in a few weeks. A full recovery is expected with prices stabilizing and then coming down to a maintainable level. Asked about price gouging, he said to look at the futures market and the prices of today reflect those prices. The higher prices are not good for the consumer and affect the economy many ways. One result of these prices will be to encourage diversification of energy resources including increasing local production, alternate sources such as wind farms and liquefied natural gas. The commissioner reminded us that Texas is the premier oil and gas producer in the nation and his job is to insure that this continues. Even though Texas has 25% of the refineries in the U.S., more could and should be built here.