DEDICATED RETIRING ABILENE ISD TEACHER LOOKS FORWARD TO TIME AT HOME

DEDICATED RETIRING ABILENE ISD TEACHER LOOKS FORWARD TO TIME AT HOME

With each day, come rain or shine, teaching has been very rewarding for Annie Coleman, who not only taught Special Education for AISD for 41 years, but drove students by bus to their job sites. She will be missed by the many students and teachers with whom she has worked over the years. “I thought it was exciting when I took a course to drive the school bus because it was something I thought I would never do,” said Annie Coleman. “I like to go out and train the students on how to behave on the job. Some of them have gone on and found jobs in the community.” The mother of one daughter, Brandilyn, 27, moved to Abilene from Milano, Texas, a town southwest of Temple.{{more}} Coleman graduated from Woodson High School, and attended McMurry University for two years majoring in Office Administration before going to work for the Abilene ISD. Coleman, 62, who is a Cooper High School Special Education Job Coach, is retiring after working for the school district for forty-one years. She was first hired in 1968 when A.E. Wells was Superintendent. She not only has been employed under three superintendents, but also had been through a few schools before she was transferred to Cooper. Teachers like Coleman who are dedicated by giving their time to teach for many years really make a difference in the lives of students and their future. They know the importance of an education. While doors continued to become open after those that shut, Coleman has indeed been blessed with her continued stay with the Special Education program. Her first job offer was at Woodson Headstart where she was a Teacher’s Aide for six months, and then she was transferred to Houston Sac becoming a Special Education Aide; then went on to Franklin Middle School in the same program. Next was the Woodson Skills Center, then she was transferred to the Woodson Excellence Center. She was at Valley View Elementary before the door came open at Cooper High School which is her final destination prior to retirement this year. What will she do after retirement? “I am looking forward to it. I will probably do a little work around my house; maybe some painting. I do not plan on sitting down and doing nothing,” Coleman shares. Even with the AISD staffing cuts, there are still capable instructors like Annie Coleman willing to encourage students to prepare to lead in the future. “Sometimes the change is good. I feel like if it works for the students, and they can achieve more, then it’s a good thing,” Coleman said. She shares some final advice to students, “Do your very best because when you get in the work force that will make a big difference”