Black Chamber Spoken Word

Black Chamber Spoken Word

Ms. Priscilla Rayford and her Cultural affairs committee brought top tier talent to the stage of the Abilene Community Theater. Izo, a rising star among Christian entertainers made the trip from Dallas. And the prolific award winning “ Neo Soul” performers of Austin, Texas kept it real as they dealt with some of the hottest issues of the day. Local talent was also on display and it was outstanding those participating from the area were Brother Rob, J. Hatton, Barbara Darnell, Sarah Turner and Ren Harris. Spoken word is performance-based poetry that is focused on the aesthetics of word play and story-telling. It often includes collaboration and experimentation with other art forms such as music, theater, and dance. There is no mandatory manner in which someone should perform; however, there are aspects of the artistry that indicate it is, indeed, spoken word. Spoken word usually tends to focus on the performance of the words themselves, the dynamics of tone, gestures, facial expressions, and more. Poetic components such as rhyme, repetition, slang, improvisation, and many more elements of poetry can be woven to create an atmosphere the audience can experience.In entertainment, spoken-word performances generally consist of storytelling or poetry, exemplified by people like Hedwig Gorski, Gil Scott Heron, Léo Ferré and the lengthy monologues by Spalding GrayThe art of spoken-word poetry has existed for many centuries. The Ancient Greeks included Greek lyric which is similar to spoken-word poetry in their Olympic Games.[1][2] Similar exercises were encouraged in political and social discourse in what was then an ancient and thriving form of democracy.Modern north-american spoken-word poetry originated from the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance[3] and blues music as well as the 1960s beatniks.[4]The term “spoken word” was first adopted to explain the new art coming out of the postmodern art movement.[5]Modern-day spoken-word poetry became popular in the underground Black community in the 1960s with The Last Poets. The Last Poets was a poetry and political music group that was born out of the African-American Civil Rights movement.[6]Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream,” Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman?” and Booker T. Washington’s “Cast down your buckets” have changed and also shaped the course of history.[7][7]The artistic utilization of the spoken-word genre in black culture today draws on and reflects a rich literary and musical heritage, and the interaction among these genres, as in the past, has produced some of America’s best-known art pieces. Like Langston Hughes and writers of the Harlem Renaissance were inspired by the feelings of the blues and the black spiritual, contemporary hip-hop and slam poetry artists were inspired by poets such as Hughes in their use of word styling. Similarly, the experimental and often radical statements of the Black Arts Movement developed a great energy with cutting-edge jazz and funk music that would expand the boundaries of black cultural persona, and thereby provide space for increasingly alternative political ideologies to be raised, discussed, and acknowledged