After 25 Years of Research, Chernobyl Still Revealing the Biological Impact of a Nuclear Meltdown

After 25 Years of Research, Chernobyl Still Revealing the Biological Impact of a Nuclear Meltdown

LUBBOCK, TX-The Museum of Texas Tech University is pleased to announce the second annual Horn Professor exhibition, Chernobyl, 25 Years Later: Biological Legacy of a Nuclear Meltdown, opening September 27, in Gallery 2 of the Museum, located at 3301 4th Street and Indiana Avenue, where the parking and admission are free. The exhibition will be on view through March of 2012.{{more}}This exhibition highlights research conducted by a team of scientists from Texas Tech University at Chernobyl, Ukraine, the site of a 1986 nuclear meltdown. The primary goal of the TTU research in Chernobyl is to achieve an understanding of the biological consequences of chronic exposure to radiation in the environment. The results are complex, but animal life is vibrant even in the most radioactive regions and the environment is not a biological desert, as was predicted at the time of the meltdown. These complexities are explored in the exhibition.This research is particularly relevant in light of the recent concerns about nuclear reactors in Japan damaged by earthquakes and a tsunami.Texas Tech’s Chernobyl research team is co-directed by Dr. Robert Baker, Horn Professor of Biological Sciences and Director of the Natural Science Research Laboratory of the Museum, and Dr. Ron Chesser, Professor of Biological Sciences and Director of the Center for Environmental Radiation Studies. Other members of the research team include Dr. Brenda Rodgers, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, and Dr. Carl Phillips, Professor of Biological Sciences.Dr. Baker has conducted over 20 research trips to Chernobyl since 1994, the most recent being in August of 2011 to collect additional mammal specimens from the radioactive zone. In total, the TTU research team has conducted more than 70 trips to Chernobyl to conduct biological research, to assist in the building of an International Radioecology Laboratory in Ukraine, and to assist in the coordination of an international coalition between the governments of Iraq and Ukraine.This is an “Up from the Basement” exhibition drawn from the collections of the Museum’s Natural Science Research Laboratory.To request special assistance, contact the Museum Education office at museum.education@ttu.edu, or call 742-2432.Stay up to date with MoTTU exhibitions and events at www.museum.ttu.edu.”Explore your world at the Museum of TTU!”